Agnolo Bronzino
Agnolo Bronzino's Oil Paintings
Agnolo Bronzino Museum
Nov 17, 1503 -- Nov 23, 1572. Italian Mannerist painter.

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Agnolo Bronzino
Portrait of Giovanni de Medici as a Child
circa 1545 Type Oil on wood Dimensions 58 cm x 48 cm (23 in x 19 in) cyf
ID: 94765

Agnolo Bronzino Portrait of Giovanni de Medici as a Child
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Agnolo Bronzino Portrait of Giovanni de Medici as a Child


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Agnolo Bronzino

Italian Mannerist Painter, 1503-1572 Agnolo di Cosimo (November 17, 1503 ?C November 23,1572), usually known as Il Bronzino, or Agnolo Bronzino (mistaken attempts also have been made in the past to assert his name was Agnolo Tori and even Angelo (Agnolo) Allori), was an Italian Mannerist painter from Florence. The origin of his nickname, Bronzino is unknown, but could derive from his dark complexion, or from that he gave many of his portrait subjects. It has been claimed by some that he had dark skin as a symptom of Addison disease, a condition which affects the adrenal glands and often causes excessive pigmentation of the skin.  Related Paintings of Agnolo Bronzino :. | Holy Family | Altar der Kapelle der Eleonora da Toledo | Cosimo I de' Medici | Allegorie des Glecks | Do not touch me |
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