Agnolo Bronzino
Agnolo Bronzino's Oil Paintings
Agnolo Bronzino Museum
Nov 17, 1503 -- Nov 23, 1572. Italian Mannerist painter.

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Agnolo Bronzino
Ugolino Martelli (mk45)
c.1537/39 Oil on panel. 102x85cm Berlin,Staatliche Museen zu Berlin-preubischer Kulturbesitz,Gemaldegalerie
ID: 25893

Agnolo Bronzino Ugolino Martelli (mk45)
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Agnolo Bronzino Ugolino Martelli (mk45)


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Agnolo Bronzino

Italian Mannerist Painter, 1503-1572 Agnolo di Cosimo (November 17, 1503 ?C November 23,1572), usually known as Il Bronzino, or Agnolo Bronzino (mistaken attempts also have been made in the past to assert his name was Agnolo Tori and even Angelo (Agnolo) Allori), was an Italian Mannerist painter from Florence. The origin of his nickname, Bronzino is unknown, but could derive from his dark complexion, or from that he gave many of his portrait subjects. It has been claimed by some that he had dark skin as a symptom of Addison disease, a condition which affects the adrenal glands and often causes excessive pigmentation of the skin.  Related Paintings of Agnolo Bronzino :. | The Panciatichi Holy Family | Noli Me Tangere (mk05) | Portrait of Maria de- Medici | Portrait of Guidubaldo della Rovere | Portrait of Bartolomeo Panciatichi |
Related Artists:
Jacob Ochtervelt
(1634, Rotterdam - 1682, Amsterdam), was a Dutch Golden Age painter. According to the RKD he was active in Haarlem where he was a student of Nicolaes Pietersz Berchem and later he moved back to Rotterdam (1655-1672) where he was a pupil of Ludolf de Jongh. After the rampjaar he moved to Amsterdam
Robert Hills
British Painter, 1769-1844 English painter and etcher. After taking drawing-lessons from John Alexander Gresse (1740-94), he enrolled at the Royal Academy Schools, London, in 1788. Village and rural scenes, and in particular studies of animals, occupied him throughout his working life; his favourite subjects were cattle, sheep, donkeys, pigs and above all deer, which he stalked for the purpose of sketching. As well as making plein-air drawings, Hills carried out careful anatomical studies of animal bones and joints. Between 1798 and 1815 he issued an extensive series of Etchings of Quadrupeds; the British Museum holds the artist's collection of his own etchings
Dante Gabriel Rossetti
English Pre-Raphaelite Painter, 1828-1882 Rossetti's first major paintings display some of the realist qualities of the early Pre-Raphaelite movement. His Girlhood of Mary, Virgin and Ecce Ancilla Domini both portray Mary as an emaciated and repressed teenage girl. His incomplete picture Found was his only major modern-life subject. It depicted a prostitute, lifted up from the street by a country-drover who recognises his old sweetheart. However, Rossetti increasingly preferred symbolic and mythological images to realistic ones. This was also true of his later poetry. Many of the ladies he portrayed have the image of idealized Botticelli's Venus, who was supposed to portray Simonetta Vespucci. Although he won support from the John Ruskin, criticism of his clubs caused him to withdraw from public exhibitions and turn to waterhum, which could be sold privately. In 1861, Rossetti published The Early Italian Poets, a set of English translations of Italian poetry including Dante Alighieri's La Vita Nuova. These, and Sir Thomas Malory's Morte d'Arthur, inspired his art in the 1850s. His visions of Arthurian romance and medieval design also inspired his new friends of this time, William Morris and Edward Burne-Jones. Rossetti also typically wrote sonnets for his pictures, such as "Astarte Syraica". As a designer, he worked with William Morris to produce images for stained glass and other decorative devices. Both these developments were precipitated by events in his private life, in particular by the death of his wife Elizabeth Siddal. She had taken an overdose of laudanum shortly after giving birth to a stillborn child. Rossetti became increasingly depressed, and buried the bulk of his unpublished poems in his wife's grave at Highgate Cemetery, though he would later have them exhumed. He idealised her image as Dante's Beatrice in a number of paintings, such as Beata Beatrix. These paintings were to be a major influence on the development of the European Symbolist movement. In these works, Rossetti's depiction of women became almost obsessively stylised. He tended to portray his new lover Fanny Cornforth as the epitome of physical eroticism, whilst another of his mistresses Jane Burden, the wife of his business partner William Morris, was glamorised as an ethereal goddess.






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