Agnolo Bronzino
Agnolo Bronzino's Oil Paintings
Agnolo Bronzino Museum
Nov 17, 1503 -- Nov 23, 1572. Italian Mannerist painter.

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Portrait of Lucrezia Panciatichi (detail) fd
c. 1540 Oil on wood Galleria degli Uffizi, Florence
ID: 05410

BRONZINO, Agnolo Portrait of Lucrezia Panciatichi (detail) fd
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BRONZINO, Agnolo Portrait of Lucrezia Panciatichi (detail) fd

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Italian Mannerist Painter, 1503-1572 Italian painter and poet. He dominated Florentine painting from the 1530s to the 1560s. He was court artist to Cosimo I de' Medici, and his sophisticated style and extraordinary technical ability were ideally suited to the needs and ideals of his ducal patron. He was a leading decorator, and his religious subjects and mythological scenes epitomize the grace of the high maniera style.  Related Paintings of BRONZINO, Agnolo :. | Portrait of Eleanora di Toledo | Portrait of Francesco I de Medici | Bia, The Illegitimate Daughter of Cosimo I de Medici | Portrait of Andrea Doria as Neptune df | Allegory the dear |
Related Artists:
Henri-Pierre Danloux
(February 24, 1753 - January 3, 1809) was a French painter and draftsman. He was born in Paris. Brought up by his architect uncle, Danloux was a pupil of Lepicie and later of Vien, whom he followed to Rome in 1775. In 1783, he returned to Lyon and Paris, where he was patroned by the Baronne Megret de Serilly d'Etigny, who secured for him a number of important portrait commissions. He emigrated to London in 1792 during the French Revolution and returned to Paris in 1801. Danloux was influenced by fashionable English portrait painters such as Thomas Lawrence (1769-1830), John Hoppner (1758-1810), and George Romney (1734-1802). In 1793, he exhibited at the Royal Academy in London which resulted in commissions from a number of British patrons. Danloux returned to Paris in 1801, and died there in 1809.
Ludovico Carracci
(Bologna 1555-1619) Painter, draughtsman and etcher. His father, Vincenzo Carracci, was a butcher, whose profession may be alluded to in Ludovico's nickname 'il Bue', though this might also be a reference to the artist's own slowness. Ludovico's style was less classical than that of his younger cousins Agostino and Annibale, perhaps because of a mystical turn of mind that gave his figures a sense of other-worldliness. Like his cousins, he espoused the direct study of nature, especially through figure drawing, and was inspired by the paintings of Correggio and the Venetians. However, there survives in his work, more than in that of his cousins, a residue of the Mannerist style that had dominated Bolognese painting for most of the mid-16th century. Ludovico maintained a balance between this Mannerist matrix, his innate religious piety and the naturalism of the work of his cousins. With the exception of some travels during his training and a brief visit to Rome in 1602, Ludovico's career was spent almost entirely in Bologna.
Abraham van den Tempel
(1622?C1672) was a Dutch Golden Age painter. He probably learned painting from his father, also a painter, but who died when he was still quite young, in 1636. That is the same year that he moved to Amsterdam, where he stayed until 1647, whereupon he moved to Leiden. According to Houbraken he was the son of a Mennonite preacher in Leeuwarden who was a respected art teacher. His father was Lambert Jacobsz (or Jacobszoon), who had taught Govert Flinck and Jacob Adriaensz Backer in their youth, both of whom were artists from Mennonite families. Abraham took the name Tempel because when he studied in Leiden, he lived in a house there with a relief of a Tempel in the keystone. He became a pupil of Jacob Backer, and studied mathematics at Leiden University. He met with great success with the Leiden city council, earning several generous commissions, including a series of three large allegorical paintings on the cloth industry of Leiden for the Cloth Hall which still hang in their original place today in the Stedelijk Museum De Lakenhal. Sir William Davidson of Curriehill, Conservator of the Cloth Staple at Veere (with his son Charles), 1664.He became master of the Guild of St. Luke in 1657 and in 1659 he was chartermaster. In 1660 he returned to Amsterdam. His pupils were Frans van Mieris the Elder, Carel de Moor, Michiel van Musscher, Ary de Vois, and Isaac Paling

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